Questions and Answers Relating to Antique Cars


E-Mail: esanders@edsanders.com

This information is brought to you by AMSOIL Direct Jobber, Ed Sanders. To learn more about state of the art lubrication and filtration, click on the AMSOIL Index above.


How often do you change you oil? Why do you change your engine oil? How often did people have to change engine oils in 1916? How many other lubrication points were there on a car at that time, and how many are there now?

Chances are you're doing exactly what your father always said to do. Changing your oil every 3000 miles. Let's look at what your grandfather had to do.

I've scanned in the lubrication training section of a book from 1916. Take a look at the drain intervals for engine oil and all the other points that had to be lubricated then.

As you will see, things have changed considerably between then and now. As new lubrication and materials technology became available, lubrication intervals lengthened, and the number of components requiring lubrication decreased.

People were glad to not have to change engine oils every 500 miles and not have to crawl all ver their cars oiling and greasing things every 100 to 300 miles. Can you imagine having to oil and grease components of your car at these intervals? You'd be stopping every couple of hours to lubricate your car.

Before learning about AMSOIL I used to change my engine oil every 3000 miles. For the last 20 years I've been changing the oil in my gasoline automobile, van and truck engines no more often than every 25,000 miles.

This is simply the result of a step in lubrication technology taken by AMSOIL 25 years ago.

I found that by using AMSOIL I no longer had varnish forming on the inside surfaces of my engines even with 25,000 mile change intervals.


This information has been brought to you by AMSOIL Direct Jobber, Ed Sanders. To learn more about state of the art lubrication and filtration, click on the AMSOIL Index below.


E-Mail: esanders@edsanders.com

Copyright 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 by Ed Sanders.