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The info in here is brought to you by AMSOIL Direct Jobber, Ed Sanders.
E-Mail: edsanders@edsanders.com


Mead is an old-fashioned beverage, but a very pleasand one, if care is taken in making it. It is often made over-strong, too much honey used to the propoption of water.

I'm giving you these old, lost formulas for delicious, healthy, non-alcoholic beverages in the hope many of you will use them for yourselves and your friends. I also hope some of you will see the opportunity to commercially produce and market a mead drink. Mead was since biblical times, and until the last 50 years a very popular drink.

Many of the formulas for mead include ingredients derived from tropical plants naturally growing in the rain forests of South and Central America. The best way to ensure the survival of the rain forests is to make them a resource that can provide the natives of the area with a viable income. How do you do this? See below:

Capitalism has been blamed for just about every environmental catastrophe of the century, but when properly applied, capitalism can be the solution to most problems. If you produce and market a product that people want or through proper advertising and marketing, people will learn to want, you will be psycicly and monetarily enriched. You can have a far greater positive effect on society and the earth by the proper use of information, knowledge, capitalism and your innovation, sweat, and ambition than by any other means.

The world is a place of opportunity. If you want to change a situation, find a way to do so while helping other people make a living. If you're going to be an environmentalist, be a practical environmentalist, not a whacko one! Bringing everyone down to the level of same level of mediocrity with socialism will not provide long term solutions to environmental problems. Giving people the opportunity to excel will, if they are given the information they need to succeed in an environmentally sound manner.

Perhaps you'll find some of that information here.

On 30 lb. honey (clarified) pour 13 gal. soft water, boiling hot. Clarify with the whites of eggs, well beaten; boil again, remove all scum as it rises, add 1 oz. of best hops and boil for 10 minutes, then pour the liquor into a tub to cool, spreading a slice of toast on both sides with yeast, and putting it into the tub when the liquor is nearly cold. The tub should stand in a cold room. When fermentation has thoroughly begun, pour the mixture into a cask, and as it works off, fill up the cask, keeping back some of the liquor for this purpose. Bung down closely when fermentation has ceased, leaving a peg hole, which can be closed up in a few days. Let it remain a year in the cask before bottling off.

Mead extract, 8 oz.; Angostura bitters, 12 oz.; honey, 1/2 gal.; rock candy syrup, 1 1/2 gal.; tartaric (or citric) acid, 1 oz.; water, 4 oz.

Water, 10 gal.; strained honey, 2 gal; burned white ginger, 3 oz. troy; lemons, sliced, 2. Mix all together and boil for half an hour, carefully skimming all the time. Five minutes after the boiling commences add 2 oz. troy of hops; when partially cold put it into a cask to work off. In about 3 weeks it will be fit to bottle.

Serving MEAD: Into a 12 oz. glass draw 1 1/2 to 2 oz. and fill within about an inch of the top with carbonated water. Mix by pouring and then foam by the use of a fine stream as in serving root beer.

Tonka beans, 2 dr.; mace, 2 dr.; cloves, 1 oz.; cinnamon, 1 oz.; ginger, 1 oz.; nutmeg, 1 oz.; pimento, 1/2 oz.; sassafras bark, 3 oz.; lemon gratings. 1 oz.; orange gratings, 1 oz. Bruise the drugs in a mortar or grind them very coarse and tie them loosely in a cheese cloth or muslin bag. Suspend them in 2 gal. of simple syrup and heat to 80 deg. C. for a few hours, the longer the better providing the temperature is not too high. The sassafras and pimento should be boiled in 2 1/2 pt. of water until it has boiled down to about 1 1/2 pt. Filter and add 2 pt. of honey and then mix with the other syrup. Add syrup enough to make 2 1/2 gal., and filter through a felt filter bag.

Cherry juice, 1 pt.; rose syrup, 4 oz.; cinnamon water syrup, 8 oz.; mead extract, 4 oz.; fruit acid, 1/2 oz. Mix thoroughly with 6 pt. of simple syrup.

MEAD ESSENCES AND EXTRACTS

MEAD extract: Oil of lemon, 1oz; oil of cloves, 2 drams; oil of cinnamon, 2 drams; oil of nutmeg, 1 dram; oil of allspice, 30 drops; oil of sassafras, 40 drops; oil of ginger, 1 dram. Cut the oils with pumace and sugar; dissolve 16 or 32 oz. alcohol. Add gradually an equal quantity of water. Clarify.

Coloring Mead.- Mead syrups may all be colored with caramel; when served they should look like a dark root beer.

Syrups, general information:

The syrup formulas given here were for use in soda fountains during their heyday. You can make your own sodas, ice cream toppings, etc. with these formulas. If you have an entrepreneurial spirit, you can market a "new" soft drink. At the very least, you can amaze you family and friends with your unique, delicious, natural beverages.

Eventually you'll see over 180 syrup formulas here including the following: Apple, apricot, banana, blackberry, calisaya tonic, capillaire (maiden hair), celery, cherry, chocolate, chinchona, cinnamon, coca, coka-kola, coffee, crab apple, cream, currant, fancy, foam, fruit juices, fruit punch, ginger, grape, hock and claret, imperial, Irish moss, imperial, iron malt + phosphate, java, kola, licorice, malted milk, maple, marshmellow, mint, nectar, nuts, nut fruit, orange, orange flower, orgeat, pear, peach, pepso-curacoa, phosphated, pineapple, raspberry, rose, royal muscadine, sangaree, sarsaparilla, sherbet, simple, strawberry, tea, vanilla, violet, whipped cream, and wintergreen.

Simple syrup

Take of white sugar (comm.), 14 lbs.; water, 1 gal. Dissolve with the aid of gentle heat, strain, and when cold add the whites of 2 eggs, rubbed with a portion of the syrup, and mix thoroughly by agitation. (The egg albumen is added to produce froth.)

Wintergreen syrup

Oil of wintergreen, 25 drops; simple syrup, 5 pt.; burnt sugar (to color), q. s.

Syrups, Maple

Maple syrup, 4 lb.; water, 2 pt.

Syrups, Crab Apple Tonic:

Sweet cider, 1 gal.; sugar, 7 lb.; extract malt, 4 fl.oz.; solution citric acid, 1 1/2 fl.oz. Evaporate the cider to 4 pints. In this dissolve the sugar, strain and add the remaining ingredients. Serve either "solid" or with foam. This syrup is said to yield a drink quite similar to some proprietary syrups, such as champagne, and kylo.

SWITCHELLS, DRINKS, BEVERAGES

Haying time SWITCHELL:

1 GALLON COLD WATER     1 CUP VINEGAR
2 CUPS SUGAR            1 TEASPOON GROUND GINGER
1 CUP MOLASSES

MIX ALL INGREDIENTS THOROUGHLY. GOOD CHILLED OR JUST AS IS.

GINGER SWITCHELL:

3/4 CUP SUGAR OR HONEY     1 TEASPOON GROUND GINGER
4 TABLESPOONS VINEGAR      2 QUARTS COOL WATER

MIX INGREDIENTS THOROUGHLY.

CIDER:

1/2 CUP MOLASSES          1/2 CUP BOILED CIDER
1 TEASPOON GROUND GINGER  2 QUARTS COOL WATER

MIX THE INGREDIENTS TOGETHER THOROUGHLY, COOL.

MEAD:

WATER
5 LBS. HONEY          PEELS OF 4 LEMONS
2 OZ HOPS             PEELS OF 4 ORANGES
2 OZ CORIANDER SEEDS  BRANDY

HEAT THE WATER ALMOST TO BOILING, ADD THE HONEY,
STIR TO DISSOLVE AND THEN BOIL 1 1/2 HOURS. AS SOON
AS THE SCUM FORMS, SKIM IT OFF AND CONTINUE TO
SKIM THE LIQUID DURING COOKING. TIE THE HOPS AND
CORIANDER SEEDS IN SEPARATE CLOTH BAGS; ADD THE
BAGS AND THE LEMON AND ORANGE PEELS TO THE HONEY
SYRUP, REMOVE FROM THE HEAT AND ALLOW TO COOL.
WHEN COOL, MIX IN A BOTTLE OF BRANDY AND POUR THE
LIQUID INTO A CONTAINER WHICH CAN BE COVERED CLOSELY.
LET STAND FOR 6 TO 9 MONTHS BEFORE SAMPLING. IF YOU
PREFER A DRYER MEAD, LET IT STAND SEVERAL MONTHS LONGER.

Mead

Mead Extract-Sarsaparilla, 2 lb.; lignum vitae wood, 1 lb.; licorice root, 1 lb.; ginger root, 12 oz.; cinnamon bark, 12 oz.; coriander seed, 6 oz.; aniseed, 2 oz.; mace, 4 oz.; Contuse or cut very finely and put up in 2 or 4 oz. packages.


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E-Mail: edsanders@edsanders.com
Copyright 1997 by Ed Sanders.